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#TeachingTipsTuesday

  • #TeachingTipsTuesday

    In the classroom

    It’s almost time for most of us to head back to the classroom, and in the spirit of collegiality, Profology announces #TeachingTipsTuesday!

    Every Tuesday for the upcoming Fall Semester starting today, Tuesday August 18th, Profology is the place to post your best teaching tips for your colleagues.  What works for you in the classroom? What pitfalls can you help colleagues avoid?

    Sally Struthers

    Just the other day on Profology, a colleague, Sally Struthers, posted in the Profology library, Fifty-two cool things that you can do in class besides lecture. I encourage you to check out the whole list, but here are a few ideas I really liked:

    *Chain story, poem, article
    *Chain math or science problem
    *Class created annotated bibliography
    *Games
    *Skits
    *Take a poll
    *One Minute Paper

    What could you add to this list?

    Here’s my tip for the day:, Bring up a debatable proposition. Before getting into a discussion, ask for a show of hands favoring one side, and then the other. Tell the students they are going to debate the issue and ask for volunteers; At least one from each side. Try to choose the students who seem most committed to their positions. After making your selection and confirming which side the student is on, now it’s time to mess with your students' minds!

    Kitchen Debate

    Tell them that have just agreed to vigorously argue the opposite side of the issue. They are not expecting this and they can become aggravated. How dare I make them work for the other team? Hey, they volunteered! Anyway, give an appropriate period of time for the debaters to prepare. maybe a week, 10 minutes maybe, depending on the issue. This can be as formal or informal as suits your class. You can make this part of a participation grade or give extra credit to incent them to take it seriously.

     The idea here is to promote critical thinking. It compels students to examine their own beliefs and to get them in the habit of looking at multiple perspectives when facing a new issue.

    Does anyone else do this? How has it worked for you? What improvements can you suggest?

    We’ve all had success and failure in the classroom. By sharing our ideas we can improve our teaching, and perhaps better enjoy our time with our students.

    What are your tips? Share them in #TeachingTipsTuesday colloquium.  I can’t wait to read them!

    Oh...one other thing....the two colleagues whose tips gain the most “likes” by the following Tuesday will win a $25 Amazon gift card. You can add your tips any day of the week, but we'll be counting likes from Tuesday to Tuesday.

    If it's Tuesday on Profology, it's #TeachingTipsTuesday.

    Add your best tips here.

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